Mundane
i'm the other roomie of Holmes who was intentionally not mentioned by Watson...

i am the Abhorsen-in-waiting and oftentimes mistaken as Luna Lovegood...

i am the HOUSEwife of Dr. Gregory House...

i am a sucker for point guards and everything about basketball.

and my address is 221B Baker St., London Below (yes. there is a place called London Below)

Read the Printed Word!
January 25, 2014

"We’ll be at Hogwarts in ten minutes," said Professor Lupin. "Are you alright, Harry?"

Harry didn’t ask how Professor Lupin knew his name.

January 12, 2014

rainbowbuttcake:

monstart:

I can’t handle the amount of sexy elf dad right now.

This man is the prettiest thing.

(Source: burattini, via inlored-deactivated20140130)

hashpe:

archatlas:

ObviousState

This… needs… more… notes..

(via inlored-deactivated20140130)

pinoy-culture:

The Beautiful, Yet Endangered Wildlife
of the Philippines.

(From top to bottom)

  1. The Philippine Eagle (aka monkey eating eagle)
  2. The Tarsier
  3. The Tamaraw
  4. The Butanding (Whale Shark)
  5. The Kagwang (The Philippine Flying Lemur, Colugo)
  6. The Pilandok (Mouse Deer)
  7. The Visayan Spotted Deer
  8. The Binturong (Bearcat)
  9. The Giant Golden Crowned Flying Fox
  10. The Maral (Visayan Leopard Cat)

The majority of us have heard of and know the Philippine Eagle, the tarsier, the tamaraw, and recently our gentle butanding. But what about our other magnificent yet rarely known animals that call the Philippines their home? How many know of the kagwang? The pilandok? The binturong? Our very own endemic deer species (we have 3) that were once abundant in all the islands but now are so rare they are only found in small populations in Panay, Negros, parts of Luzon, and in Palawan, where in other parts of the country such as Cebu, Leyte, & Samar they have become extinct in those islands. What about our own feline species, the leopard cat, which recently studies have started to classify the leopard cats found in the Visayas such as in Panay, Negros, & Cebu as their own sub-species known as the Visayan Leopard Cat, which many of us don’t even know it exists in our forests? And what about our other animals, of our reptiles & marine life? The Philippines is a bio-diversity hotspot, one of the biggest ones in the world with new species being discovered almost every year both animals and plants. Yet, our animals aren’t really taught to us, instead we constantly learn about animals from other countries. Which is great, but where is the love for our very own animals, some which are critically endangered? Why isn’t there enough education on our own animals to help encourage conservation efforts?

Only we can save and help protect our country’s beloved creatures before its to late.

For more on Philippine wildlife, there is a documentary on the biodiversity of the Philippines called Endangered Tales, which you can watch in the following links.

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3
Part 4
Part 5
Part 6
Part 7

Photo Sources: [x], [x], [x], [x], [x], [x], [x], [x], [x]

reads book:
*favourite character dies*
me:
maybe if i read this again he won't die this time
January 10, 2014
nationalpostphotos:

Above the clouds — A man with a child walks towards the top of Vodno Mountain in Skopje, Macedonia, Thursday, Jan. 9, 2014. Weather forecasts predict ongoing sunny weather on the mountains with mild temperatures and fog in the lowlands and valleys. (AP Photo/Boris Grdanoski)

nationalpostphotos:

Above the clouds — A man with a child walks towards the top of Vodno Mountain in Skopje, Macedonia, Thursday, Jan. 9, 2014. Weather forecasts predict ongoing sunny weather on the mountains with mild temperatures and fog in the lowlands and valleys. (AP Photo/Boris Grdanoski)

zacffren:

i like being alone, not feeling alone

(via epic-humor)

(Source: deatheatrs, via epic-humor)

January 8, 2014

definitelydope:

The Narrows Zion National Park (by Avery Carlton)

earthandman:

It’s a discovery that could change our understanding of early humans. An incredibly well-preserved, 1.8-million-year-old skull from Dmanisi, Georgia suggests the evolutionary tree of the genus Homo may have fewer branches than previously believed.
Read more.

earthandman:

It’s a discovery that could change our understanding of early humans. An incredibly well-preserved, 1.8-million-year-old skull from Dmanisi, Georgia suggests the evolutionary tree of the genus Homo may have fewer branches than previously believed.

Read more.

(via wild-earth)